sex marijuana orgasm cannabis

Can marijuana lead to better sex?

  • Sex and marijuana are regarded by many as a winning combination. Cannabis has been used for centuries to enhance pleasure and heighten sexual desire, but...
  • Is it really true that marijuana can help to improve the quality of sex, or is this just a myth?
  • Here we explain what science has to say about the potential effects of this ancient plant when it comes to the bedroom.
sex marijuana orgasm cannabis

Our ancestors used so-called "green gold" as a powerful aphrodisiac and evidence suggests that ancient civilisations were already using cannabis to improve sex and enhance enjoyment way before us. Traditional ayurvedic medicine in India has been using cannabis for hundreds of years to improve sexual desire, cure impotence, reduce inhibitions and boost lubrication. In many African countries, marijuana is traditionally regarded as a tool for treating sexual health problems. In Egypt, Morocco and Lebanon, many people take "kif", which is a blend that combines cannabis and other substances and is used as an aphrodisiac.

Science has confirmed it

Myth? Placebo? Thanks to science, we can now fathom out whether any truth lies in these "recipes for pleasure" and whether cannabis really is a good ally for our sex life. Different scientific studies seem to indicate that cannabis actually is an effective aphrodisiac. One of the plant's active (and most well-known) ingredients is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which promotes the release of dopamine (the happy hormone) and anandamide (a compound that creates peace and happiness feelings) in the brain. It's hardly surprising that when this fire bomb of happiness and pleasure is dancing around our system, cannabis sparks an increase in libido and sexual pleasure, especially when combined with the increase in testosterone caused by THC.

According to Virginia Montañés Sánchez, journalist and social anthropologist, cannabis can prove to be a great ally for enhancing pleasure and improving the quality of sex. For over a decade, she has worked as a communicator and researcher in the field of drugs policy for a number of national and international institutions and she uses her experience and know-how to explain why cannabis can be a powerful tool to enjoy better sex.

How does cannabis benefit sex?

As pointed out by Virginia Montañés, different scientific studies suggest cannabis has some properties that could enhance the quality of intimacy. Accordingly, marijuana appears to provide the following benefits:

  • Inhibits anxiety: reduces the fear of failure and the tension some people feel before sexual intercourse.
  • Relaxes the body and mind: reduces the feeling of stress making for an experience that flows effortlessly.
  • Heightens the senses: hypersensitivity can lead to increased physical pleasure.
  • Increases libido: cannabis can help to fight lack of arousal.
  • Strengthens or forges emotional bonds between the people involved.
  • Users focus more on the technical aspects in order to satisfy their sexual partner.

The endocannabinoid system and female sexuality

Several researches on the effects of exogenous cannabinoids – the ones present in cannabis plants – have pointed to the potential of the endocannabinoid system in sexually active women. Seemingly, these cannabinoids have the ability to activate the receptors in the neurotransmitters involved in sexual functioning. Also, the concentration of endocannabinoids – the ones that are produced in the brain – has been proven to significantly affect female sexual arousal.

The key lies in the amount

Cannabinoids have the so-called "bimodal effect", namely that they have opposite effects depending on the administered amount. It is also important to bear in mind that the effects of cannabis vary from strain to strain and from person to person. There are several factors that can affect the way our organism reacts (method of use, amount, personal circumstances), significantly influencing the final outcome. The studies that have been carried out into the experience of cannabis users have had varying results; some respondents say that they are unable to have sex if they use cannabis, whereas others cannot engage in sexual activity without it.

This substance apparently has just as many benefits as drawbacks when it comes to our love life. The key seems to lie in the amount and consumption habits, evidence showing that moderate amounts of cannabis taken on an occasional basis can improve the user's sex life increasing libido and sexual pleasure, while abusive and prolonged use over time will cause the experience to worsen.

The effects of cannabis seem to vary also according to gender and, at optimal doses, it affects men and women in a different way. As mentioned before, every person reacts differently to the plant and has a different level of tolerance, thus, establishing an optimal dose is not possible. Figuring out the right amount in order to enjoy better sex is something you will have to do on your own. 

What do the polls say?

Despite the fact that science seems to be shedding some light on the matter, the effect of cannabis on an individual's sexuality appears to be something that varies according to different factors and the characteristics of that person. In a survey carried out by the magazine Psychology Today, 67% of those interviewed said that marijuana improved their sexual experiences, while 12% claimed it had exactly the opposite effect.

Another survey conducted in 1974 in the US among 345 students revealed that cannabis acts as a libido enhancer, being more effective for women than for men ¬– 58% and 39% of efficacy respectively. The survey also showed that when it comes to enhancing physical pleasure men do better than women, with 60% of the interviewed men claiming to have experienced increased physical pleasure, compared to just 43% of women.

In another American survey carried out in 1984 among 60 men and 37 women – sexually active and regular users of cannabis – 75% of respondents said cannabis was directly linked to increased sexual pleasure and to physical – hugs, caresses – and emotional closeness, with 58% claiming to have better orgasms and 16% reporting even higher climax rates following cannabis consumption.

On the other hand, some strains appear to have an uplifting effect, which could contribute to improve performance in the love department. According to a survey conducted in Canada in 2001, cannabis consumption can lead to increased sexual stimulation, better self-confidence and greater drive, resulting in prolonged intercourse.

With cannabis for medical and recreational purposes being gradually legalised in some countries and states, it looks like the stigma which has historically surrounded this plant is beginning to disappear along with our inhibitions and fear of exploring new sensations and experiences. At Dinafem, we recommend enjoying sex and marijuana in a safe, fun and responsible way. And if you want to put a soundtrack to your nights of passion, here you will find a playlist especially conceived to turn up the heat, suggestive songs and sensual rhythms that will awaken your most primal instincts. Let yourself be carried away by Dinamex and this Spotify playlist made by Eros himself.

Biobliography

1. Marijuana use and sexual behavior Ronald A. Weller & James A. Halikas Pages 186-193 | Accepted 29 Apr 1983, Published online: 11 Jan 2010

2. Grotenhermen, Franjo (2008). Cannabis como medicamento. Barcelona: La Cañamería Global

3. Kaplan, The new sex therapy: active treatment of sexual dysfunctions, Nueva York: Quadrangle, 1974; traducción castellana: La nueva terapia sexual: tratamiento activo de las disfunciones sexuales, Madrid: Alianza, 2002

4. Weller, Ronald A. y Halikas, James A. "Marijuana Use and Sexual Behavior," Journal of Sex Research (1984) 20:186.

5. Hathaway, Andrew (2003). «Cannabis effects and dependency concerns in long-term frequent users.: A missing piece of the public health puzzle" Addiction Research and Theory.: vol1, n. 6, p. 448.

6. Klein, Caroline; Hill, Matthew N.; Gorzalka, Boris (2012). Circulating Endocannabinoid Concentrations and Sexual Arousal in Women. The Journal of Sex medicine, vol. 9, n.6.

7. Klein, Caroline (2011). The endocannabinoid system and female sexual arousal. Tesis doctoral en Filosofía. Universidad de British Columbia.

02/06/2017

Comments from our readers

4 comments
5 out of 5 (based on 4 ratings)
Leave a comment!

Read comments in other languages:

Contact us

x
Contact us